Be Safe!

While traveling internationally you must always be aware of your surroundings and the situations you are putting yourself into.  Travel in groups, use the buddy system and good judgment at all times.  If you are going out for the night or away for the weekend, make sure you tell someone where you are going, where you will be staying and when you plan to return.   

  • Safety begins when you pack.  To help avoid becoming a target, do not dress in a way that could mark you as an affluent tourist.  Expensive-looking jewelry, for instance, can draw the wrong attention. 
  • Avoid handbags, fanny packs (a.k.a. bum bags) and outside pockets that are easy targets for thieves.  Inside pockets and a sturdy shoulder bag with the strap worn across your chest are somewhat safer.  One of the safest places to carry valuables is in a pouch or money belt worn under your clothing.
  • Only take taxis clearly identified with official markings.  Beware of unmarked cabs.
  • Put your name, address and telephone number on the inside and outside of each piece of luggage. Use covered luggage tags to avoid casual observation of your identity or nationality. 
  • Photography:  In many countries you can be detained for photographing security-related institutions, such as police and military installations, government buildings, border areas and transportation facilities. If you are in doubt, ask permission before taking photographs.
  • If your possessions are lost or stolen, report the loss immediately to the local police.  Keep a copy of the police report for insurance claims and as an explanation of what happened.
  • Trains: Well-organized, systematic robbery of passengers on trains along popular tourist routes is a problem. It is more common at night and especially on overnight trains.  If you see your way being blocked by a stranger and another person is very close to you from behind, move away.  This can happen in the corridor of the train or on the platform or station.  Do not accept food or drink from strangers.  Criminals have been known to drug food or drink offered to passengers.  Criminals may also spray sleeping gas in train compartments. Where possible, lock your compartment.  If it cannot be locked securely, take turns sleeping in shifts with your traveling companions.  If that is not possible, stay awake.  If you must sleep unprotected, tie down your luggage and secure your valuables to the extent possible.  Do not be afraid to alert authorities if you feel threatened in any way.  Extra police are often assigned to ride trains on routes where crime is a serious problem.
  • When you leave the United States, you are subject to the laws of the country you are visiting.  Therefore, before you go, learn as much as you can about the local laws and customs of the places you plan to visit.  Good resources are your library, your travel agent, and the embassies, consulates or tourist bureaus of the countries you will visit.  In addition, keep track of what is being reported in the media about recent developments in your country.
  • Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP):  A free service provided by the U.S. Government to U.S. citizens who are traveling to, or living in, a foreign country.  STEP allows you to enter information about your upcoming trip abroad so that the Department of State can better assist you in an emergency.  STEP also allows Americans residing abroad to get routine information from the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.  It is a good idea to sign up for the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program –think of it as checking in– so that you may be contacted if need be, whether because of a family emergency in the U.S., or because of a crisis in the area in which you are traveling.  It is a free service provided by the State Department, and is easily accomplished online at https://travelregistration.state.gov.
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