Posts Tagged With: United States

Editor’s Top 10 Picks

Here are my personal top 10 places I would like to see and revisit all over the world:

 

1) Tuscany, Italy

Something about this place draws me in. I can picture myself eating exquisite Italian food alfresco and drinking a glass of wine from the vineyards. Hands down, this is my most favorite place I would like to visit.

2) Accra Beach Hotel, Christ Church Parish, Barbados

I have been to Barbados before and I stayed at the Accra Beach Hotel, and personally, that was the best vacation of my life. It brings back so many memories, of walking along the boardwalk, relaxing in the pink and white grain sand, friendly locals, being able to swim up to the bar and have a drink, and singing quite off-pitch at the karaoke bar at the hotel.

3) Andes Mountains, Peru

The views here are spectacular. I am very adventurous so I was thrilled when I was able to ride a horse up the mountain on a very narrow path, one foot to your left were cactus’ and one foot to your right was over a 200 foot cliff, and the picture above is the lake we had to cross with our horses to go up the mountain

4) Cape Cod: Provincetown, Hyannis, Martha’s Vineyard 

I go to Cape Cod every summer and Provincetown, Hyannis, and Martha’s Vineyard are my favorite places to visit. My family and I spend a majority of our time in Hyannis mostly because of the town with the cute shops and a variety of restaurants, and we also go parasailing there. Provincetown is one of my new favorites because of its lively atmosphere and town. There we usually go whale watching and explore around the town. Martha’s Vineyard we save for the last couple of days where we just relax and enjoy the beach and the gingerbread-like houses in Oak Bluffs. And we usually like to rent a moped for the day and ride around Edgartown and stop off at Gay Head Cliffs (Aquinnah) for breathtaking views of the ocean.

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5) Santorini, Greece

My favorite thing about Greece are the white houses and the blue accents and how it looks so clean and fresh. I can picture myself walking around exploring the food markets and gazing at the sunset.

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6) Mont St. Michel, France

After talking about this in one of the blogs, I fell in love with this place. It reminds me of that castle in the movie “Tangled” (a Disney movie). The architecture looks very romantic and gothic at the same time, it is enchanting to look at.

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7) Phuket, Thailand

There is something mystical about Phuket, Thailand. It reminds me of Pirates of the Caribbean, and the rock formations are captivating!

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8) Ta Phrom Temple, Cambodia

I was fascinated by the ancient temple in Cambodia ever since it was featured on the Travel Channel. It is so mysterious yet captivating.

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9) Bora Bora, French Polynesia

Bora Bora seems like the place where you can relax and get rid of all your stress and troubles. With the white sandy beaches, picturesque landscape, and interesting architecture, this is the best Caribbean vacation.

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10) Leavenworth, Washington

In the spirit of Christmas, Leavenworth is a town that I have always wanted to visit since I was little, with the entire town decked out in Christmas lights, horse-drawn sleigh rides through the snow, and the weekends there are like a Dr. Seuss tale, with the townsfolk joining hands at 4:30 around the gazebo for the lighting of the tree and some good old-fashioned caroling.

 

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Best Places To Hunt For Buried Treasure

If you are the type of person that likes to stay away from tourist traps, then this article is for you! This is a list of the best places to hunt for buried treasure according to lonelyplanet.com

1) Opal mining, Coober Pedy, Australia

Outback adventure and the chance to strike it rich: can you dig it? The good folk of Cooper Pedy can… and have done, ever since opal was first discovered there in 1915. Named from the local aboriginal term ‘kupa-piti’ (meaning ‘whitefella in a hole’), this far-flung town is known as the opal capital of the world; it’s also famous for its underground homes, excavated to escape the desert sizzle. While hardcore miners need a government permit, anyone is allowed to fossick – in local parlance, ‘noodle’ – through the town’s many mine dumps. Don’t let the whimsical verb fool you: many a noodler has hit paydirt.

Before going it alone, try a sanctioned noodle at Tom’s Working Opal Mine (www.tomsworkingopalmine.com.au) or Old Timers’ Mine (www.oldtimersmine.com).

2) Oak Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Home to a huge, mysterious hole nicknamed the Money Pit, this otherwise unremarkable island is the destination for those answering the call of booty. First discovered in 1795, the cryptic Pit is the site of the world’s longest-running treasure hunt… although just which treasure is being hunted remains the cause of frenzied debate. Rumoured riches hidden within the hole (which supposedly runs at least 60m deep) include Captain Kidd’s stash, the lost jewels of Marie Antoinette, documents proving the ‘real’ identity of Shakespeare (Francis Bacon, FYI) and the holy grail of treasure seekers, the, erm, Holy Grail. Beware the booby traps!

Oak Island is privately owned, and permission is required before setting off to solve the mystery of the Pit. Start here for legends and links: www.oakislandtreasure.co.uk.

3) Geocaching, Las Vegas, USA

Cache-ING! Looking for loot in Las Vegas? Forget fruit machines and bank breaking: these days, thousands of Sin City visitors are forgoing gambling for geocaching. A real-life treasure hunt that relies on GPS and cryptic clues, geocaching is more likely to yield a Kinder Egg than that of the nest variety, but that hasn’t stopped five million enthusiasts worldwide. Vegas has become a must-do for the high-tech hobbyists, with more than 2400 stashes hidden in and around the city, including scores on the Strip, in the surrounding desert and in spooky spots for ‘haunted’ night caching.

Head to www.nevadageocaching.com and www.geocaching.com for the lowdown on what lies beneath.

4) Gold Detecting, Papau New Guinea

There’s gold in them thar hills… and on them thar islands… and under that thar sea. Papua New Guinea is absolutely awash with the shiny stuff, and while much of it falls into the hands of multinational mining companies, there’s no reason the budding prospector can’t have a pick or a pan as well. Gold fever peaked in the 20th century, with nuggets the ‘size of goose eggs’ attracting feverish prospectors, including a certain Mr Errol Flynn. These days, PNG’s rough-and-tumble landscape (social and geographic) make joining an organised tour a better idea than striking out on your own. They’re not cheap, but with a potential ‘Eureka!’ moment lurking beneath every step, who cares?

PNG Gold Tours offer fully escorted, two-week gold-hunting trips to Misma Island, an area renowned for rich alluvial deposits. Visit www.pnggoldtours.com.

5) Digging for Dinos, Australia

Thrilled by theropods? Is ‘muttaburrasaurus’ more than just an amusing tongue-twister to you? Then it’s a fair bet that joining a dinosaur dig is your idea of the ultimate treasure hunt. And where better to pander to your inner palaeontologist than outback Winton, home to Australia’s largest horde of dino bones? The not-for-profit organisation Australian Age of Dinosaurs holds tri-annual Dinosaur Discovery Weeks, giving enthusasauruses the chance to excavate, plaster and prep fossils buried for the last 95 million years. No experience is necessary, but only 13 spots per dig are available. Book quickly: they’ll be gone before you can say ‘Diamantinasaurus matildae’.

Digs run between July and September. Find out more and reserve your spot at australianageofdinosaurs.com/aa-dig-a-dino.php.

6) Roman Coins, English Countryside

Either togas suffered from a lack of pockets or departing Romans hadn’t time to stop at a currency exchange, because England is absolutely aglitter with ancient currency. And it’s yours for the picking. Amateur archaeologists and quaint folk with metal detectors have been responsible for massive finds across the island; in 2010, an NHS chef uncovered a pot filled with 52,000 coins dated between AD 253 and 293, the largest such hoard ever discovered. Coins have been unearthed as far north as Northumberland and west of Exeter. Study up, be sure to get landowners’ permission and you too could hold history in your hands!

Contact the National Council for Metal Detecting for information on detector hire, regional clubs and valuing your treasure: www.ncmd.co.uk.

7) Norman Island, British Virgin Islands

Peg-legs, black spots, West County accents: if there was a map showing the home of every pirate cliché known to fancy-dressers, Norman Island would be marked with an X. Not shivering your timbers? Perhaps its fictional name, Treasure Island, will make you go ‘aaaaargh’. The inspiration behind Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of mutiny and booty, Norman Island today is a haven for snorkellers and nature lovers (no shoulder-parrots spotted… yet). But rumours of undiscovered doubloons hidden in The Caves – a series of aptly murky watery caverns – attract rum-hoisters convinced the island remains home to ‘plenty of prizes and plenty of duff!’.

Norman Island is a short boat trip from Tortola, the biggest and most populated of the BVIs. Tortola is reached via ferries or flights out of various Caribbean hubs. See www.normanisland.com.

8) Artic Amethysts, Kola Peninsula, Russia

Far above the Arctic Circle, all that glitters is not ice: western Russia’s extreme north sparkles with the purple slivers of the prized amethyst. The rugged Kola Peninsula – a mineralogist’s dream with its hundreds of rare rock and metal species – is home to the windswept, amethyst-rich Tersky Coast. Unlike gold, the amethyst is surprisingly easy to find if you know where to look (Tersky’s Korabl Cape – ‘Ship Cape’ – is a great place to start): simply look for the purple clumps. In addition to its beauty, amethyst has a legendary quality which may come in handy in these frozen, vodka-loving lands: it’s believed to protect its bearer from drunkenness.

While spotting amethysts is simple enough, getting around Kola Peninsula is not. Consider joining a mineralogical tour with the South Kola group (www.kolaklub.com/southkola/mne.htm) or Kola Travel (http://kolatravel.com/mineralogical_holidays.htm).

9) Fossil Gawking, Gobi Dessert, Mongolia

To the hurried eye, the vast Gobi Desert looks like 1.3 million square-kilometres of dusty nothing. But stop, stoop and focus: the Gobi is one of the world’s richest fossil depositories, with many ancient (as in,100-million-years-ancient) remains lying only centimetres from the surface. It was here the first dinosaur eggs were discovered; other major excavated finds include rare mid-evolutionary birds and some of the world’s best-preserved mammal fossils. Hunting hotspots include the Flaming Hills of Bayanzag and Altan Uul (‘Golden Mountain’). You’re not supposed to take your finds home with you – they’re rightfully considered national treasures – but here, especially, the thrill is in the chase.

Independent (not package) tours can be hard to stumble across, but not impossible. Many guesthouses in Mongolia’s capital Ulaanbaatar can help get your expedition underway.

10) Wreck Diving, Florida, USA

It may be known as the ‘Sunshine State’, but many of Florida’s richest attractions haven’t seen the light of day in centuries. Thought to be home to more sunken treasure than any other state in the USA, Florida’s blue waters may be hiding more than US$200 million worth of loot. Now home to Disneyworld and pampered retirees, the state was once a notorious pirate haven (even Blackbeard dropped anchor here), and its hurricanes sent countless Spanish galleons to Davy Jones’ locker. Check local legalities before you wriggle into your wettie, and never dive alone in Florida’s oft-treacherous waters: those wrecks are down there for a reason.

The website www.treasuresites.com/indexn.htm is a treasure trove itself, with super-detailed listings of potentially enriching (and legal) wreck-dive spots across Florida.

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Top 10 Regions for 2013

These are the top 10 regions for 2013 according to lonelyplanet.com

1) Corsica, France

Best for: activites, events, food

Mixing the cultures of Italy and France yet fiercely Corsican, the French Mediterranean island of Corsica has a furious beauty. It is this epic beauty combined with its challenging topography that make it a spectacular choice to host the historic centenary of the initial stages of the Tour de France. Race organisers wanted the hundredth Tour to start in an enchanting location, and decided Corsica was the place; this will be the first time the race has braved its challenges.

2) The Negev, Israel

Best for: adventure, activities, off the beaten track

For decades the Negev was regarded as nothing but a desolate desert. But today, this region is a giant greenhouse of development. Think eco-villages, spa resorts and even wineries. In the next few years a new international airport at Timna is scheduled to open, followed by a high-speed railway to Eilat and more hotels. Time is running out to experience the desert as nature intended.

3) Mustang, Nepal

Best for: activities, off the beaten track, culture

The completion of a road connecting Mustang to China in the north and the rest of Nepal to the south will make all the difference to this remote region. Lo Manthang, or Mustang as it’s usually called, has been dubbed ‘little Tibet’ or ‘the last forbidden kingdom’; though politically part of Nepal, in language, culture, climate and geography, it’s Tibet. Until 1992 nobody from outside was allowed in; for a while after that it was opened up to a few hundred a year, and these days anyone can enter, though the pricey trekking permit keeps the numbers down. Expect that to change.

4) The Yukon, Canada

Best for: activities, adventure, off the beaten track

This vast and thinly populated wilderness has a grandeur and beauty that can only be properly appreciated in person. But while few places in the world today are so unchanged over the course of time, change has started coming fast to the Yukon. In 2013 it is still one of the least densely populated regions on the planet (there’s almost 14.2 sq km/5.5 sq miles for each hardy local) but its tremendous mineral wealth is drawing new residents in a reprise of the fabled Klondike Gold Rush of 1898. Climate change means that parts of the far north are actually dissolving into the Arctic Ocean and the glacier-clad parks are undergoing profound change.

5) Chachapoyas & Kuelap, Peru

Best for: adventure, culture, off the beaten track

Nestled in the northern Peruvian Andes, the placid mountain city of Chachapoyas is small, quiet and a pain in the neck to reach. But this charming agricultural centre sits amid some of the country’s most incredible cultural and natural treasures, including an entire river valley’s worth of pre-Inca ruins, the funerary site of Karajía, and one of the world’s tallest waterfalls. The glorious isolation isn’t going to last for long. For the past half-dozen years, the Peruvian government has been quietly paving roads and improving other infrastructure to make the area more visitor-friendly.

6) The Gulf Coast, USA

Best for: activities, family, value for money

An area that has become synonymous with the words ‘oil spill’ doesn’t sound like it’d be a vacation must-do. But a lot has happened since a deep-water drilling operation off the coast of Louisiana went fatally awry in 2010. The Gulf Coast – never a place to take disaster lying down – has rebounded. Rolling sand dunes once again sparkle and seasonal travellers are once again enjoying the Gulf’s tepid waters, not to mention its tender locally caught fish. The ‘Redneck Riviera’ is edging back to its best.
 
7) Carinthia, Austria
 
Best for: activities, family, value for money
 

With belts tightening across Europe, the Alps are fast becoming the exclusive preserve of the champagne set… but lesser mortals will find plenty to love about Carinthia. With ski resorts nestled on every mountain top, Carinthia is best known outside Austria for uncrowded slopes and après-ski where you don’t have to take out a second mortgage just to buy a beer. Backing onto Italy and Slovenia, the region dilutes the Austrian efficiency with Mediterranean laissez-faire. So where are the crowds? Check out Carinthia now, while peace and quiet reigns; it won’t stay like this forever.

8) Palawan, The Philippines

Best for: off the beaten track, adventure, culture

Palawan incorporates thousands of sparkling, rugged islands and is fringed by 2000km of pristine coastline. So far Palawan’s natural marvels have only been sampled by plucky backpackers. Not for much longer. The trail these pioneers have blazed is set to explode, with regional airlines waking up to Palawan’s potential and clambering to schedule direct flights to the capital. Throw in the mushrooming growth of style-conscious boutique hotels normally found in places like Ko Samui or Bali, and you can feel that Palawan is ready to hit the big-time in 2013.

9) Inland Sea, Japan

Best for: culture, activities, off the beaten track

Tokyo, Kyoto, Mt Fuji… the islands of the Seto Inland Sea? You’d be forgiven if the name of this vast stretch of water in Japan’s west doesn’t ring any bells. With the exception of Miyajima, with its oft-photographed vermillion ‘floating’ torii (shrine gate), most of the Inland Sea islands aren’t on the usual international-tourist hit list. Fair enough. They’re out of the way, and there’s just so much to do in Tokyo. But those who make the effort are rewarded. Many of the islands in this roughly 400km-long waterway offer the chance to experience a Japan without all the bells, whistles and bullet trains.

10) Campania, Italy

Best for: culture, family, food

Campania is home to Italy’s most sumptuous stretch of coastline (the Amalfi Coast), one of its most mind-blowing and ebullient cities (Naples), the menacing beauty of Mt Vesuvius, and the frozen-in-lava ancient Roman city of Pompeii. This year it is receiving an enormous injection of cash as part of its role in hosting the UN’s fourth Universal Forum of Cultures from April to July. Events will include art exhibitions from all five continents, music, cinema, dance, street artists and theatre, circus acts, food markets and workshops.

 

 

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Best Adventure Vacations

These are the best adventure vacations for the thrill seekers who are studying abroad according to tripadvisor.com

1) San Juan, Puerto Rico

Aquatic thrills abound in Puerto Rico, from world-class surfing at Rincon where the swells reach 35 feet to relaxed scuba diving, particularly around Mona Island, Desecheo Island and Vieques. On terra firma, the tropical terrain yields prime hiking, horseback riding and rock climbing opportunities.

2) Bali, Indonesia

Take in the lush, volcanically active landscape of Bali while whitewater rafting on the Ayung and Unda rivers. Or get the heart pumping off-shore with an ocean-rafting sightseeing and snorkeling tour in boats that reach 44 miles per hour. Surfers hit the island’s western side for big-time swells.
 
3) Grand Canyon, National Park, Arizona, United States
 
At this behemoth of a canyon, whitewater and calm water rafting trips plunge along 277 river miles, fixed-wing and helicopter tours soar above its mile-deep maw and hikes and mule rides cover the terrain from rim to rim. Horseback tours operate from stables just outside the park’s south entrance.
 
4) Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, United States
 
Located about two miles north of the airport, the Kona Coast State Park’s trio of tranquil, uncrowded beaches cater to swimming, kayaking, picnicking and snorkeling. It’s possible to spot Hawaiian green sea turtles among the arches and caves of the offshore coral reefs. Surfers congregate in the winter for the big surf.
 
5) Thailand
 
Thailand takes adventure to another level. The south’s beaches and islands offer sea kayaking, cave abseiling and climbing on stunning limestone stacks that rise from the Andaman Sea. Jungle treks and canopy tours await inland. In the north, mountains and rain forest backdrop exhilarating outdoor adventures.
 
6) Chengdu, Sischuan, China
 
Perched in a high mountain valley, Huanglong or Yellow Dragon National Park offers invigorating adventure options. The ambitious can trek to Lhasa, whitewater raft or embark on multi-day river journeys. Alternatively, a five-mile trot brings you to five terraced, temple pools glowing with stunning hues.
 
7) Yosemite National Park, California, United States
 
Within the nearly 1,200 square miles of one of America’s first national parks are top-notch hiking trails to waterfalls, giant sequoia groves, meadows and the iconic granite cliff, Half Dome. Three stables inside the park boundaries lead horse and mule rides that last from two hours up to a full day.
 
8) Vietnam
 
Vietnam’s famed jungles are amazingly alive. Jungle trekking reveals a near unimaginable wealth of flora and fauna. Nowhere offers more creature encounters than the country’s oldest national park, Cuc Phuong, home to a staggering 43 biodiversity hotspots and over 300 types of rare tropical birds.
 
9) Brazil
 
The wealth of flora and fauna and opportunities to observe them are unparalleled in the Amazon. Riverboats ply the waters of this fascinating wilderness, home to pink river dolphins, clamorous howler monkeys and raucous toucans. Photograph your adventure, run the rapids or stalk elusive jaguars by night.
 
10) Morocco
 
The Saharan dune field of Erg Chebbi undulates along the southern Moroccan border, near the small Berber village of Merzouga. Four-wheel-drive and camel safaris traverse this desert region, bringing you front and center with fine red sands piled up to 820 feet high and star-saturated night skies.
 
 11) Corcovado National Park, Osa Peninsula, Province of Puntarenas, Costa Rica
 
This tropical wilderness, home to more than 350 species of birds is a nature lovers’ paradise. Explore pristine rainforest where scarlet macaws and toucans swoop and howler monkeys cavort. Horseback ride through dense jungle and along remote beaches where high breaks are perfect for surfing.
  
12) Machu Picchu, Sacred Valley, Cusco Region, Peru
 
Hike the Inca Trail to the majestic Lost Cities of the Incas, hidden in dense Amazonian jungle, 7000 feet above sea level. This ancient road treks 25 miles from Cuzco through deep Andean gullies and is not for the faint-hearted. Climb up to overlook the ruins and the Urubamba Valley from Huayna Pichu Mountain.
 
13) Moab, Utah, United States
 
With three scenic byways, plus Canyonlands and Arches national parks close at hand, Moab inspires outdoor desert adventures. Cycle, climb or hike among sandstone cliffs and mind-blowing rock formations, raft the Colorado River or take a four-wheel-drive day trip through the arid backcountry.
 
14) Provence, France
 
Cycling through Provence’s rolling hills and charming villages, along twisting country roads and past 2000-year-old Roman aqueducts is by turns exhilarating and relaxing. Elsewhere in the region, a slew of activities awaits, from cliff climbing to skydiving to horseback riding or alpine skiing.
 
15) Ambergris Caye, Belize Cayes, Belize
 
Belize’s largest island and an often overlooked Caribbean gem offers astounding diving and snorkeling. This English-speaking nation is home to the second-largest coral reef system in the world. If you want to stay atop the waves, this Caribbean idyll provides fabulous fishing, sailing and kayaking.
 
16) Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, United States
 
A single road accesses the six million acres of wild landscape in Denali National Park, and few private vehicles are allowed to travel it. Instead, park shuttles transport visitors into the wild for backpacking, wildlife spotting and attempts to climb 20,320-foot Mount McKinley, North America’s highest peak.
 
17) Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
 
The wealth of wonderful wildlife in the Galapagos defies the imagination. Get up close to fearless sea lions, majestic tortoises and amiable iguanas by hiking, snorkeling, kayaking and diving. Evolve to another level entirely by cycling by cinder cones, lava flows and tunnels or multi-hued beaches.
 
18) Kruger National Park
 
A game drive in search of the Big Five – lions, leopards, cape buffalo, elephants, and rhinos – is only the start in this South African safari mecca. Hit one of four adventure trails in a 4 X 4 for a self-guided tour through the park, take a ranger-led bush walk or soar in a hot-air balloon outside its boundaries.
 
19) Nepal
 
When it comes to mountain climbing, Nepal is the big one, but the home of the world’s highest peak has got a lot more to offer than mighty Everest and its neighboring summits. The Himalayan kingdom also offers excitements such as the stunning Annapurna trek, wildlife jungle safaris, rafting and paragliding.
 
20) Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia
 
With 1,400 miles of coral reef stretching along the Queensland coast and 1,500 fish species, the World Heritage List-designated Great Barrier Reef is a scuba lover’s dream destination. Accompany underwater exploration with coastal adventures like bungee jumping or rafting through rain forests near Cairns.
 
21) Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, United States
 
Ashy plumes of smoke and red-hot lava stream from the active craters in this Big Island park, 30 miles southwest of Hilo. Crater Rim Drive takes cyclists through deserts and rain forests and into the caldera of Kilauea volcano. More than 150 miles of hiking trails cover its 333,000 acres.
 
22) Scottish Highlands, Scotland, United Kingdom
 
Hike or mountain bike past castles, lochs, Highland Cows and purple heather in the romantic Scottish Highlands. Experience the beauty of the country as you trot north on the West Highland Way from Glasgow to Fort William or explore the country’s first national park, Loch Lomond and the Trossachs.
 
23) Milford Sound, South Island, New Zealand
 
As one of the wettest places on earth, Milford Sound provides an emerald-green and waterfall-rich backdrop for hiking, biking and kayaking. The Fjordland stretches more than 124 miles south to Preservation Inlet, with an extensive trail network to support travel of the self-propelled variety.
 
24) Northern Norway, Norway
 
More than 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle waits this land of midnight sun, Northern Lights and spectacular skiing. The Lygen Alps offer a slew of snowy delights, from off-piste skiing and snowmobiling to dog sledding and reindeer trekking. Once snows melt, glacier walks, kayaking and hiking top the bill.
 
25) Flinders Ranges National Park, South Australia, Australia
 
In the Flinders Ranges, easily reachable from Adelaide, hiking and cycling trails criss-cross the southern region, caves and gorges carve a beautiful swath through the center, and kangaroos bound across red earth in the northern Outback. Four-wheel drive safaris delve into this designated National Landscape.
 
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